Elfin Lakes is AmazingElfin Lakes in Garibaldi Provincial Park is an absolutely phenomenal, though long, hiking, biking, snowshoeing and skiing trail that begins at the Diamond Head area in Squamish.  From Whistler Village, the trailhead is just over an hours drive away, located near the south end of Garibaldi ParkGaribaldi Provincial Park is the massive wilderness park of nearly two thousand square kilometres that stretches from Squamish to Pemberton.

  • Squamish Hiking Trails ProTrail has almost constant views
  • Squamish Hiking Trails ProDeep, mostly untouched wilderness
  • Squamish Hiking Trails ProSunsets are spectacular
  • Squamish Hiking Trails ProThe hut is amazing, heated & huge
  • Squamish Hiking Trails ProImpossibly idyllic, snowy forest
  • Squamish Hiking Trails ProLots of terrain beyond the lakes
  • Squamish Hiking Trails ProWarming hut with fireplace at 5k!
  • Squamish Hiking Trails ProThe hut is a warm oasis in paradise
  • Squamish Hiking Trails ProHard to beat winter wonderland!
  • Squamish Hiking Trails ConGaribaldi Park is not dog friendly

Whistler Snowshoeing

Blueberry Park Steep, Short, Dog Friendly Snowshoe TrailBlueberry Trail  Brandywine Falls Easy, Dog Friendly Snowshoe TrailBrandywine Falls  Cheakamus River Easy, Dog Friendly Snowshoe TrailCheakamus River  Elfin Lakes Moderate, Very Long Snowshoe TrailElfin Lakes  Flank Trail Moderate, Dog Friendly Snowshoe TrailFlank Trail  Joffre Lakes Moderate, Steep Snowshoe TrailJoffre Lakes  Nairn Falls Easy, Dog Friendly Snowshoe TrailNairn Falls  Parkhurst Easy, Dog Friendly Snowshoe TrailParkhurst Ghost Town  Rainbow Falls Steep & Very Short Snowshoe TrailRainbow Falls  Rainbow Lake Moderate, Steep & Long Snowshoe TrailRainbow Lake  Rainbow Park Easy, Flat, Short, Dog Friendly Snowshoe TrailRainbow Park  Taylor Meadows Moderate, Steep Snowshoe TrailTaylor Meadows  Whistler Train Wreck Easy, Dog Friendly Snowshoe TrailTrain Wreck  Wedgemount Lake Challenging, Steep Snowshoe TrailWedgemount Lake

 Best Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking JanuaryJanuary  Best Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking FebruaryFebruary  Best Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking MarchMarch  Best Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking AprilApril  Best Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking MayMay  Best Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking JuneJune  Best Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking JulyJuly  Best Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking AugustAugust  Best Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking SeptemberSeptember  Best Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking OctoberOctober  Best Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking NovemberNovember  Best Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking DecemberDecember

If you are driving the Sea to Sky Highway to Whistler, Garibaldi Park will be the vast wilderness of snow-capped mountains on your right.  The Elfin Lakes trail is very well marked and maintained and leads to the wonderful, Elfin Lakes hut.  This amazing hut sleeps 33 and is solar powered and propane heated.  There is a charge of $15/person(payable online) to stay the night there which is a small price to pay for the beautiful comfort after the long, 11 kilometre snowshoe or hike to get there.  This area is very popular with skiers as well as snowshoers in the winter and deep snow covers the trail usually from November to June.  The trail to Elfin Lakes starts out ascending through deep forest, reaching the Red Heather hut after 5 kilometres.  This is a small warming hut equipped with a wood stove complete with a stack of wood free to use, though sleeping here is for emergencies only.  The final 6k from this hut to Elfin Lakes takes you along a beautiful ridge with amazing views of snowy mountains all around.  The sheer distance of this snowshoeing trail ranks it as difficult, though overall you will just be doing a moderately steady ascending trail. Expect to take four hours to reach the Elfin Lakes hut as you are almost constantly ascending a gradual, though consistently uphill trail.

Leaving Elfin Lakes at Sunset

Expect to take four hours to reach the Elfin Lakes Hut as you are almost constantly ascending a gradual, though consistently uphill trail.  There are several jaw-dropping views along this final 6k stretch.  This trail is so well marked with orange poles and tree markers that you can reliably find your way after dark or before sunrise with good lights to assist you.  You often see, with some shock, skiers trudging up the trail, not far from the trailhead after the sun has set.  Making their way to the Elfin Lakes hut in the dead of night seems to be a pastime of quite a few local skiers and boarders.  As this trail is within Garibaldi Park, dogs are not allowed.  This is a courtesy to all the animals that inhabit the park and the potential disturbance that dogs my introduce to their environment.  BC Parks staff can issue fines for dogs in the park.  Though it is rare, it does happen as Elfin Lakes is regularly staffed with rangers and even has a separate ranger station near the Elfin Lakes hut.  Getting to the trailhead can be difficult during periods of heavy snow.  The gravel road runs deep and high into the mountains to the trailhead parking lot.  You should be prepared with tire chains and may have to walk from the lower parking lot below the main, usually deep with snow trailhead parking lot.

The Elfin Lakes Trail

Elfin Lakes Trail is Moderately ChallengingDriving to the Elfin Lakes trailhead is quite fun as you emerge from the tacky strip mall along the Sea to Sky Highway and quickly ascend into the wilderness.  If you are driving south from Whistler you turn left after Canadian Tire onto Mamquam Road and continue past the golf course on your right and then through Quest University.  Not long after you pass the university the road narrows and turns from pavement to gravel.  In the winter months you have to be prepared for snow on the road and several signs will indicate chains must be carried.  You may be able to drive to the trailhead, then return from your hike a day or two later to a metre of snow on the access road.  You will get little sympathy from road crews if you find yourself stranded due to poor planning.  There is another parking lot before the main parking lot at the trailhead.  It is located before the last steep and if snow covered, potentially dangerous final section of road.  If you are worried about driving on steep, snowy sections of road, be sure to park at this lower area.

The Elfin Lakes Trailhead and Parking

Mamquam Road becomes Garibaldi Park Road as you continue ascending ever steeper to the trailhead parking area.  At the parking area you will find a nice information board and an outhouse.  Parking is free at all BC Parks, however there is a charge for overnight parking in Garibaldi Provincial Park.  Fees Per Night: $10 Adult - $5 Kids(6-15)  Campsite fees must be paid online in advance at the BC Parks Garibaldi Provincial Park reservations page. The 11 kilometre(7 mile) hike to Eflin Lakes is a constant and steady ascent that begins with several switchbacks.  The sign at the trailhead shows the distances to the Red Heather Shelter(5k), Elfin Lakes(11k) and Mamquam Lake(22k).  The trail to Elfin Lakes is only moderately challenging, however the long distance makes it quite challenging if you are carrying a heavy pack or bringing kids along.  The fact that there is a shelter after only 5 kilometres indicates that the 11k distance to the lakes is a bit of a journey.

 

Elfin Lakes Trail View of Squamish

Elfin Lakes Trail Relentless Ascent

The Red Heather Hut at 5kThe Red Heather Shelter at 5k is for some, a destination on its own.  An unexpectedly idyllic little hut that for much of the year is consumed by snow.  The roof is often a metre deep with snow and unable to slide off, builds up around the edges, making the hut often invisible from the side.  Getting in the front entrance usually requires an abruptly steep slope down to the door.  The back door has an adjacent window that glows a beautiful blue from the wall of icy snow that often buries the back door.  The Red Heather hut is a survival shelter/warming hut, that is not to be used as an overnight shelter, except of course when absolutely necessary.  On snow camping is allowed in the vicinity of the Red Heather hut in the winter months.  On first glance this may seem like a poor substitute to Eflin Lakes, however, the short hike is quick and easy.  And you will be under a magnificent starry sky surrounded by idyllic mountains.  If the weather is particularly bad, camping here may be a nice idea.  Most push on to the ever more scenic trail that quickly ascends to Paul Ridge.  On cold and snowy days, the wonderful wood stove and stack of wood outside makes it a very enticing pit-stop on the way to Elfin Lakes.  Two sturdy picnic tables and a sink, propane stove top burner and large pot make the shelter an effective place to picnic and warm up.  The walls are lined with clothing hooks indicating that this shelter sees a lot of traffic.  For the most part however, you will find the hut deserted.  Occasionally in the evening you will find a couple drinking wine by the fire, enjoying this rustic paradise.  If you are lucky enough to be here on a clear night, the stars will shine like diamonds this far from the bright lights of civilisation.

The Elfin Lakes Red Heather Warming Hut

The Elfin Lakes Red Heather Warming Hut

The Elfin Lakes Red Heather Warming Hut

If you can pull yourself away from the luxurious warmth of the Red Heather Hut you will find the trail quickly becomes more challenging.  Increasingly steep sections lead to some downhill parts.  All the while following the easily visible orange poles that mark the winter snowshoe route.  The poles are frequent and have reflectors on them making them visible at night if you have a light.  If you are motivating and competent hiking after dark, the Elfin Lakes trail is pretty easy to follow.  If you are not well prepared, however, you may easily stray from the trail and get dangerously lost.  From the trailhead to the Red Heather hut is hard to stray from, even after dark, however, the Red Heather hut to the Elfin Lakes hut is well marked, but tricky to follow at night.  If you don't know what you are doing, you can easily lose the trail and get into big trouble.

Leaving the Red Heather Hut

The Elfin Lakes Trail

The section of trail from the Red Heather hut to Elfin Lakes is considerably more scenic than the first 5 kilometres of the trail.  Much of the route is along Paul Ridge which gives you sweeping views both left and right of endless snowy mountains.  If you hike it during a full moon, the mountains light up all around you in a surreal world trapped between day and night.  The serenity and vastness of this part of the world are magnificent.  Eventually after a long and sensationally beautiful 11 kilometres, the Elfin Lakes hut comes into view.  Just like the Red Heather hut, almost entirely buried in snow much of the year, you have to slide down an icy slope to reach the front door.  Once inside the warmth hits you.  A large furnace blasts out heat and after your eyes adjust to the inky darkness, you can't help but be surprised how huge the hut is inside.  From the outside, buried in snow it looks tiny.  On the inside you find two floors complete with kitchen, lots of seating areas and tables... and bunk beds to accommodate 33 people!

The Elfin Lakes Trail

The Elfin Lakes Trail

The Elfin Lakes Trail

The Elfin Lakes Hut

History of Elfin Lakes

History of Elfin LakesElfin Lakes has been a popular destination for hiking, snowshoeing and skiing for almost a century.  In the 1930's Ottar and Emil Brandvold immigrated to Canada from Norway.  Hearing of the wilderness paradise in the Garibaldi region they combed the area for a suitable location to build an alpine lodge.  Joined by Ottar's future wife, Joan Mathews of West Vancouver, they decided on Diamond Head, next to the two small lakes to build their dream lodge.  Emil, Ottar and Joan built Diamond Head Lodge by hand using the forest surrounding what would become known as Elfin Lakes.  The name Elfin Lakes is suspected to have come much later.  One record indicates the lakes were once called Crystal Lakes.  The earliest indication they were named Elfin Lakes comes from the pamphlet from the Diamond Head Lodge in 1978.  Since 1978 the lakes have been known as Elfin Lakes.  For thirty years, beginning in the late 1940's the Diamond Head Lodge hosted visitors from around the world.  Year-round visitors enjoyed the breathtaking scenery and rugged hospitality.  In 1958 the Diamond Head Lodge was bought by the Provincial Government and leased back to the Brandvold's.  The Brandvold's continued to operate the lodge until their retirement in 1972.  In 1973 the lodge was permanently closed and in 1974 the Elfin Lakes Hut was built to replace the deteriorating lodge.  In 2009 the crumbling remains of the Diamond Head Lodge were removed.  One corner of this beautiful and cherished building still remain as a tribute to the Brandvold's contribution to the history of this wonderful place.

Elfin Lake Hut History

Elfin Lake Hut History

The Elfin Lakes Hut

The Elfin Lakes HutThe Elfin Lakes campground is located in an incredibly beautiful area of distant, enormous, jagged mountains and beautiful rolling hills and valleys.  The two cute little lakes lay next to the amazing Elfin Lakes hut.  To snowshoe to this hut is quite something.  As you approach it in winter it looks quite small, buried as it invariably is in metres of snow.  The entrance is reached by descending a snow staircase.  Upon entering you feel an unexpected wave of heat as you realize the hut is heated.  There are also propane stoves and very unexpectedly, working lights.  The Elfin Lakes hut is solar powered.  Amazing.  Stairs lead up to a impressively large sleeping area which can accommodate 33 people.  A fact you would have never believed from your approach view outside.  Not only can it sleep 33, but it does so in style.  Beautifully organized, solid looking, wooden bunk beds built right into the structure make the hut look like some characteristically beautiful, European ski lodge.  What an great place Elfin Lakes is!  There are several outhouses next to the Elfin Lakes hut and plenty of beautiful spots in the area to put up a tent.  Even in the bitter cold of winter you will see a few tents a few hundred metres from the hut.  There is an amazing plateau near the hut that edges onto a sweeping view of the valley below.  This is just one of many million dollar view tent sites to be found in this year-round, mountain paradise.  Fees Per Night: $10 Adult - $5 Kids(6-15)  Campsite fees must be paid online in advance at the BC Parks Garibaldi Provincial Park reservations page.

Elfin Lakes Hut Buried in Snow

Elfin Lakes Hut Buried in Snow

The Elfin Lakes Hut

The Elfin Lakes Hut

Elfin Lakes Hut Snow Buried Entrance

The Elfin Lakes Hut Upper Floor

The Elfin Lakes Hut Lower Floor

The Elfin Lakes Hut Lower Floor

Trailhead & Parking Directions

Uphill Gravel FSR Road - Whistler Hiking TrailsThe Diamond Head/Elfin Lakes trailhead to Garibaldi Provincial Park is located in Squamish near the southern end of the park.  Like the Cheakamus Lake trail, the Diamond Head/Elfin Lakes trail is bike friendly.  Considerably steeper and longer than the trail to Cheakamus Lake, however.  This trailhead is fairly popular year-round.  The well laid out 11 kilometre route to Elfin Lakes is well marked in the winter and popular with skiers and snowshoers.  The wonderful Elfin Lakes hut is a huge draw to this hike in the winter as it is heated and has solar power as well as room for 33 people!  Anytime of the year the alpine around Elfin Lakes is stunning.  You get amazingly dramatic mountain views in all directions and on a sunny day in the summer it is paradise.  The trailhead parking lot is high above Squamish up a long, rapidly ascending road.  So getting up there in the winter usually requires tire chains.  You may not need them, but you must have them to get to the trailhead.  You may get turned away if you don’t have chains with you.  Or worse, you may get up to the parking lot without chains, then get snowed in and unable to drive out.  There are excellent signs directing you to the Elfin Lakes/Diamond Head trailhead parking.  From the Sea to Sky Highway follow the signs to "Garibaldi Park Diamond Head."  You will want to turn onto Mamquam Road at the Canadian Tire store in Squamish(left if coming from Whistler, right if coming from Vancouver).  Continue following the signs for 16k as they go up a gravel road ending at the parking lot at the trailhead.

Camping & Bivouacking at Elfin Lakes

The Elfin Lakes Hut in Garibaldi Provincial ParkReservations for Camping BC Parks Garibaldi ParkDay hiking in Garibaldi Provincial Park is free and parking at all the trailheads is free as well.  If you are camping overnight in Garibaldi Park you will have to pay a campsite fee.  There are ten official BC Parks campsites in Garibaldi Park with dedicated and very well designed tent pads, platforms or clearings at each.  They are all now reservable year-round, with the exception of the Red Heather campsite near Elfin Lakes which is only open for winter camping.  In 2018, for the first time you can legally register and pay to camp in the backcountry beyond the official campsites.  The areas you can wilderness camp is quite restricted in an effort to not overrun the park and maintain some control over the massive numbers of hikers in the park.  Backcountry Camping Permits for Garibaldi Park cost $10 per person, per night.  Children 6-16 years old pay $5 per person, per night and kids under 6 years old are free.  Staying at the Elfin Lakes hut costs a bit more at $15 per adult, per night and kids 6-15 pay $10 per person, per night.  Kids under 6 are free.  The Elfin Lakes hut fee includes your backcountry camping permit, so one adult staying in the Hut pays a total of $15.  Campsite fees must be paid online in advance at the BC Parks Garibaldi Provincial Park reservations page.

Camping at Elfin Lakes is an amazingly beautiful experience.  The valley is huge with stunning mountain peaks all around.  The hiking/snowshoeing possibilities seem endless.  Year-round the Elfin Lakes hut has bunk beds for 33 people(11 double bunks and 12 single bunks).  The hut also has 4 huge picnic tables inside as well as 2 propane stove-top burners, a washing sink as well as a giant propane stove and solar powered lights.  Adjacent to the hut is a row of outhouses.  The campsite area at Elfin Lakes is quite large and well organized.  35 tent platforms dot the landscape and on a typical summer weekend, you will find most of them occupied!  In the winter months, these tent platforms with be hidden under metres of snow and you can put up a tent nearly anywhere you want.  There are various excellent spots overlooking the vast valley just a few dozen metres from the hut.  For those seeking solitude, there are endless tent site possibilities further away.  Hardcore winter campers often shovel out snow caves to sleep in.  Often you will find them in the slopes adjacent to the hut.  Pretty amazing and surprisingly comfortable.  In 2015, the new campsite at Rampart Ponds was completed.  Just 1.5 kilometres before Mamquam Lake, this new campground replaces the old one at Mamquam Lake that was closed recently.  It is located 10 kilometres from Elfin Lakes on the trail to Mamquam Lake.  The new campground has 12 tent platforms, an outhouse and food storage facilities.

A Quinzee(snow cave shelter) Outside the Hut

A Quinzee(snow cave shelter) Outside the Hut

Elfin Lakes Tent

Elfin Lakes Tent

Elfin Lakes Tent

Wilderness Camping Guidelines for Garibaldi Park

Wilderness Camping & Bivouacking in Garibaldi Provincial ParkAll overnight visits to Garibaldi Park require reservations beforehand.  In the past camping was allowed only in the designated BC Parks campsites.  New in 2018, for the first time you can camp in the vast wilderness beyond the campgrounds.  There are several eligibility requirements you must adhere to.  Your camp must be at least 2 kilometres from any established trail or campground and your group size must be 10 or less.  Your camp must be at least 30 metres from water sources such as a lake, stream or wetland.  You and your companions must be experienced wilderness hikers proficient in route finding and preparation.  It is stated on the Garibaldi Provincial Park BC Parks site that you should be an experienced mountaineer, climber, ski tourer or possess advanced wilderness skills.  You must be committed to the “Leave No Trace” ethos of camping and hiking.  In addition to this there is an overall wilderness camping zone that denotes permissible zones that you can camp in the wilderness.  Consult the Wilderness Camping Map which denotes prohibited camping zones such as the Diamond Head area and approach, Columnar Peak, the Gargoyles, Opal Cone, and Mamquam Lake.  Much of the area around Garibaldi LakeBlack TuskPanorama Ridge and Mount Price.  Cheakamus Lake has a sensitive wetland habitat at the east end of the lake where Cheakamus River flows into the lake.  There is a wonderful and very inviting plateau of land above Wedgemount Lake close to the end of the lake where the pours out via Wedgemount Falls.  Near Russet Lake where the north-south running UTM 511E forms the boundary for both the south and north sections of the Spearhead Traverse. Wilderness camping is prohibited west of this line. In the south, this line roughly dissects The Fissile and Overlord Glacier east of Russet Lake campground.  In the North, UTM 511E dissects the Decker glacier. Wilderness camping reservations/fees cost the same as for the campgrounds.  Fees Per Night: $10 Adult - $5 Kids(6-15).  Campsite fees must be paid online in advance at the BC Parks Garibaldi Provincial Park reservations page.

Facilities at Elfin Lakes

The Elfin Lakes hut has bunk beds for 33 people(11 double bunks and 12 single bunks).  The hut also has 4 huge picnic tables inside as well as 2 propane stove-top burners, a washing sink as well as a giant propane stove and solar powered lights.  Adjacent to the hut is a row of outhouses.  The campsite area at Elfin Lakes is quite large and well organized.  35 tent platforms dot the landscape and on a typical summer weekend, you will find most of them occupied!  In the winter months, these tent platforms with be hidden under metres of snow and you can put up a tent nearly anywhere you want.  There are various excellent spots overlooking the vast valley just a few dozen metres from the hut.  For those seeking solitude, there are endless tent site possibilities further away. Fees Per Night: $10 Adult - $5 Kids(6-15)  Campsite fees must be paid online in advance at the BC Parks Garibaldi Provincial Park reservations page.  Day hiking is free and there is no charge for parking.  There are several outhouses(pit toilets) at Elfin Lakes as well as at the Red Heather hut 5k into the trail.  There are plenty of fresh water sources on the trail as well as at Elfin Lakes.  The lower lake is reserved for drinking water and the upper lake is for swimming.  Cell phone reception is usually good along the trail and at Elfin Lakes.

Leaving the Elfin Lakes Hut

Restrictions at Elfin Lakes

Fires Prohibited - Whistler Hiking TrailsNo Motorized VehiclesGaribaldi Provincial Park is not dog friendly.  This is mainly out of respect for the wildlife that frequent the area.  There are several great place to hike with your dog in and around Whistler.  Parkhurst Ghost Town, Whistler Train Wreck, the Sea to Sky Trail, Cheakamus River, Logger’s Lake, Ring and Conflict Lake, Mount Sproatt, Brandywine Meadows and Brew Lake are all dog friendly hiking trails.  Bikes are allowed on the main trail from the parking lot to Elfin Lakes only.  There are no garbage facilities at Elfin Lake and you must pack out what you pack in.  Open fires are prohibited in the park and camp stoves should be used for all cooking.  All motorized vehicles are not permitted in the park, including motorcycles, ATV's and snowmobiles.

Snowshoeing From Elfin Lakes at Sunset

Wildlife at Elfin Lakes

WildlifeThere are frequent animal sightings on the trail and beyond Elfin Lakes.  Black bears, marmots, mountain goats and deer roam Garibaldi Park, though only occasionally seen.  Bald eagles and ptarmigans are sometimes spotted on the trail to Elfin Lakes.  Of the many animals you will encounter in the park, black bears are the ones you must be most aware of.  Fortunately there are food storage facilities at Elfin Lakes as well as at Rampart Ponds.  Always remember when encountering bears, calmly back away and wait for them to leave the trail.  Don't approach bears and do your best to not surprise them.  Though black bears are potentially dangerous, there has never been an unprovoked bear attack in Garibaldi Provincial Park or Whistler.

Snowshoeing From Elfin Lakes at Sunset

Elfin Lakes Snowshoe Map

  Blueberry Park Steep, Short, Dog Friendly Snowshoe TrailBlueberry Trail  Brandywine Falls Easy, Dog Friendly Snowshoe TrailBrandywine Falls  Cheakamus River Easy, Dog Friendly Snowshoe TrailCheakamus River  Elfin Lakes Moderate, Very Long Snowshoe TrailElfin Lakes  Flank Trail Moderate, Dog Friendly Snowshoe TrailFlank Trail  Joffre Lakes Moderate, Steep Snowshoe TrailJoffre Lakes  Nairn Falls Easy, Dog Friendly Snowshoe TrailNairn Falls  Parkhurst Easy, Dog Friendly Snowshoe TrailParkhurst Ghost Town  Rainbow Falls Steep & Very Short Snowshoe TrailRainbow Falls  Rainbow Lake Moderate, Steep & Long Snowshoe TrailRainbow Lake  Rainbow Park Easy, Flat, Short, Dog Friendly Snowshoe TrailRainbow Park  Taylor Meadows Moderate, Steep Snowshoe TrailTaylor Meadows  Whistler Train Wreck Easy, Dog Friendly Snowshoe TrailTrain Wreck  Wedgemount Lake Challenging, Steep Snowshoe TrailWedgemount Lake

More Whistler Snowshoe Trails

More Whistler Snowshoe TrailsThere are plenty of beautiful and free snowshoe trails in Whistler and Garibaldi Provincial Park.  From the surreal paintings of Whistler Train Wreck to the magnificent mountain serenity of Wedgemount Lake in Garibaldi Park.  Trails range from extremely easy, like the short, flat trails to Brandywine Falls and Rainbow Park.  To challenging and long trails to places like Elfin LakesTaylor Meadows and Wedgemount Lake.  Whistler even has a growing network of snowshoe trails to Parkhurst Ghost Town on the far side of Green Lake.  There are a couple pay-use snowshoeing areas in Whistler, however most free trails are as good or better.  Whistler Train Wreck is an easy/moderate snowshoe trail that takes you through a deep forest, over Cheakamus River via a very pretty suspension bridge, and to a series of decades old, wrecked train cars.  Elfin Lakes in Garibaldi Provincial Park is another beautiful place to snowshoe.  Located at the south end of Garibaldi Park, the Elfin Lakes trailhead is found in Squamish.  The trail is not overly difficult, however it is quite long.  A consistently uphill, 11 kilometre(13.7 mile) trail through some spectacular scenery takes you to the marvelous Elfin Lakes hut.  For easier snowshoeing, Rainbow Falls is a good option.  Located just a short drive from Whistler Village, the Rainbow Trail is a beautiful trek through the forest in a winter wonderland to a hidden waterfall surrounded by deep pillows of powdery snow.  For more challenging snowshoeing, Joffre Lakes Provincial Park is hard to beat.  A long, though beautiful drive into the mountains, north of Pemberton takes you to this moderately challenging, 11 kilometre(6.8mile) roundtrip snowshoe trail.  The frequently steep, winding trail takes you through a winter paradise and around, or over three frozen lakes.  Back in Whistler, an excellent place to snowshoe is to Parkhurst Ghost Town.  Sitting on the far side of Green Lake, Parkhurst was a thriving logging community several decades ago.  It has since been abandoned except for intermittent squatter communities over the years. 

Train Wreck - Best Whistler Snowshoeing

Whistler Hiking Trail RatingThe trail to Whistler Train Wreck is an easy, yet varied route through deep forest, across a great suspension bridge over Cheakamus River, to a stunning array of wrecked train cars. The trail from your car to the wrecks only takes about 15 minutes, however once you reach one wreck, you see another, then another. There are seven wrecks in total that are spread over an area about 400 metres long.  Along with the surreal train wrecks painted with stunning murals, you find yourself in a thick forest that runs along Cheakamus River. Cheakamus River is a beautiful, wild and crashing river that snakes past the train wrecks. Numerous side trails take you to some marvelous viewpoints, several metres above the rushing water below.  If you follow a trail past the wrecks(heading north or in the direction of Whistler Village) you will emerge at the train tracks. If you are adventurous you will then walk along, beside the tracks for a couple hundred metres and some truly breathtaking views of Cheakamus RiverTrain Wreck - Best Snowshoeing in Whistler

Whistler Train Wreck Map

Wedgemount Lake - Best Whistler Snowshoeing

Wedgemount Lake is a steep and difficult hike in the summer when there is no snow.  It doesn't require technical skill, but it is just exhausting.  You gain 1220 metres of elevation in just 7 kilometres(+2 in the winter) and hiking with a heavy pack takes about 2.5 to 3.5 hours to reach the lake.  In the winter, on snowshoes, the Wedgemount Lake trail is considerably harder, as well as a couple kilometres longer owing to the undrivable, snow buried access road.  The snow covered trail is hard to follow, even with frequent trail markers.  Also, on snowshoes a step on steep ground is one step forward, half a step backward.  You plod on slowly and with each step slipping back part way. If you can get past the difficulty of the exhausting winter trek to Wedgemount Lake you will reach an amazing paradise in the mountains.  The Wedgemount Lake hut is an extraordinary oasis of warmth in the middle of the beautiful Wedgemount Lake valley.  Anyone can use the hut, anytime.  It can sleep up to 8 reasonably comfortably and consists of two large tables on the lower level and a small loft that can fit four people.  Sporadically used by skiers in the winter, though rarely used by snowshoers due to the difficulty of the trail in the winter.  If you do make it up to Wedgemount Lake you will be rewarded with a phenomenally beautiful, snow filled mountain paradise of a valley.  The Wedgemount Lake trail is deep with snow from late December to late June most years.  If you snowshoe it November to mid December or mid June to early July, you will only need your snowshoes partway up the trail.  Wedgemount Lake - Best Snowshoeing in Whistler

Wedgemount Lake Snowshoe Map

Rainbow Falls - Best Whistler Snowshoeing

Rainbow Falls Beautiful SnowshoeingRainbow Falls is a fantastic way go get yourself into some deep snow quickly from Whistler Village.  The short, winding, and ever-changing hiking trail to Rainbow Falls is the same as the much more popular trailhead for Rainbow Lake.  The trailhead is marked as the Rainbow Trail, and the trail quickly ascends into the forest winding left, right, up and down almost constantly.  21 Mile Creek, always on your right can be either seen or heard as you snowshoe through the forest to the somewhat hidden Rainbow Falls.  The Rainbow Falls/Rainbow Lake trailhead is located just a couple hundred metres from Rainbow Park on Alta Lake which is another great place to snowshoe in Whistler.  The Rainbow Falls trailhead is the same as the Rainbow Lake trailhead, located halfway along Alta Lake Road on the far side of Alta Lake. The Rainbow Falls trail is short, varied and relatively easy. This well used trail never goes in a straight line and goes up and down through a beautiful and deep forest.  There is only one small, easy to miss sign to Rainbow Falls, but finding the falls is easy.  To find Rainbow Falls, begin at the trailhead parking for "Rainbow Trail" on Alta Lake Road.  Follow the trail as it winds along the river.  If you come to obvious forks in the trail, choose the right fork.  In 0.8 kilometres from the trailhead parking you will arrive at Rainbow Falls.  The trail to Rainbow Falls is fairly popular in the winter so the snow is usually well packed down so you often don't need snowshoes.  The route to the falls is never in a straight line.  Zig-zagging left and right, up and down, some parts are steep, but at just 0.8 kilometres, the shortness of the trail makes it suitable for kids.  The topography and sheer volume of snow make this a very fun trail to snowshoe for everyone.  Expect to take less than an hour, car to car, but much longer if you stop for a picnic or to play in the snow.  Rainbow Falls - Best Snowshoeing in Whistler

Flank Trail Snowshoe Map

Rainbow Park - Best Whistler Snowshoeing

Rainbow Park SnowshoeingRainbow Park is one of the hugely popular swimming beaches in Whistler in the summer.  In the winter it is a spectacular vantage point across Alta Lake to Whistler Mountain and Blackcomb Mountain.  The beautiful ski run lines snake down the mountains and by December Alta Lake is usually completely frozen.  Hockey games occur at various spots on the lake and the Valley Trail leading to and from Rainbow Park is buried in snow and unplowed all winter.  When the heavy snow of December comes, the valley trail becomes a snowshoeing and cross country ski trail.  It can still be hiked, but once you reach Rainbow Park you will be knee deep in snow.  The piers so well used in summer are frozen in place and, like everything else are buried in snow.  This snowshoe trail is excellent for the novelty of snowshoeing and great for kids.  Snowshoes are not really necessary due to short length of the trail and the relatively small size of the park.  If you have small kids, however, they will be in paradise.  By Christmas the park is often waist deep in snow, and if you are new to snowshoeing you will have a great time.  And if you do bring kids, you will have trouble getting them to leave.  Rainbow Park is a very easy, 1 kilometre trail from the parking area at the dead end of Lorimer Road to the park.  It is a relaxing trail that doesn't change in elevation.  It runs for a while along the River of Golden Dreams then crosses the river on a cute little bridge giving you your first view of Alta Lake.  Just past the bridge on your left you can walk to a viewing platform over the lake.  Back on the trail it is just another five minutes to the lake.  Rainbow Park - Best Snowshoeing in Whistler

Rainbow Park Snowshoe Map

Joffre Lakes - Best Whistler Snowshoeing

Joffre Lakes Hike RatingJoffre Lakes Provincial Park is a hiking paradise in the summer and a skiing and snowshoeing paradise in the winter.  About 1 hour and 20 minutes north of Whistler gets you to the Joffre Lakes trailhead.  Located up on the Duffy Lake Road north of Pemberton, Joffre Lakes is well known for its incredibly surreal, turquoise water.  In the winter of course, all three of the Joffre Lakes are frozen over but the trail is popular with skiers and snowshoers between the months of November and April.  The Joffre Lakes trail is fairly well marked and almost always tracked out in the winter it is still possible to lose the trail after dark or or during heavy snowfall.  Joffre Lakes Provincial Park is centred around the three Joffre Lakes.  All of them are beautiful on their own and each more beautiful than the last.  Frozen over in the winter, you won't be able to marvel at the amazing turquoise colours the lakes, caused by light reflecting off of the particles of glacial silt suspended in the water.  In the winter, with the lakes frozen and the trees weighed down with snow, Joffre Lakes takes on a serene beauty, with the low sun cutting through the trees and the forest brightly reflecting.  The third of the Joffre Lakes ends in a U-shaped valley where you will find the far side of the lake towering with glaciers relentlessly crushing down on the lake.  The sun fills the valley and the silence is wonderful.  Joffre Lakes - Best Snowshoeing in Whistler

Joffre Lakes Provincial Park Winter Map

Parkhurst Ghost Town - Best Whistler Snowshoeing

Parkhurst Ghost Town SnowshoeingWhistler has an absurd number of wonderful and free hiking trails and Parkhurst Ghost Town certainly ranks as one of the most unusual, exotic and interesting. Parkhurst was a little logging town perched on the edge of Green Lake way before Whistler was Whistler.  Up on the ridge where Parkhurst sits, the views are sensational. Green Lake far below, a solid unnatural looking mass of green.  Blackcomb Mountain and Whistler Mountain out in the distance to the left and Rainbow Mountain across and beyond Green Lake.  If you have a good look around Parkhurst today, you can find remnants of its past almost everywhere you look.  From the old disintegrating truck from the 50's to the absurdly and improbably located car being consumed by the forest.  What makes Parkhurst Ghost Town such a great hiking trail and destination is where it is located and the trail to get to it.  The Parkhurst trail, one of several ways to get to Parkhurst Ghost Town, runs along the scenic Green River and next to the still active train tracks that run through Whistler.  There always seems to be something to see.  From the beautiful meadow along the train tracks, to the suddenly deep forest where you have to play a game of finding the next, pink tree marker or risk wandering off the trail.  The trail markers are numerous, and though getting lost is inevitable, you can only stray a few metres before, the river or steep terrain push you back onto the marked trail.  Once up on the ridge above Green Lake where Parkhurst is located, the forest takes on a spooky feel.  Trees are all far apart and with branches only high up give the forest a unnaturally lifeless look.  Parkhurst Ghost Town - Best Snowshoeing in Whistler

Parkhurst Ghost Town Snowshoe Map

Brandywine Falls & Bungee Bridge - Best Whistler Snowshoeing

Brandywine Falls, though extremely popular in the summer and fall months, hides behind a massive, snowplow formed, wall of snow from December to March.  The gate to the parking lot is closed and buried.  Attempting to hike to the falls on foot is tough if there has been a lot of recent snow as you find yourself thigh deep in snow right from the start.  But if you have snowshoes this trail becomes a winter paradise.  This makes Brandywine Falls one of the easiest and most beautiful places to snowshoe in Whistler.  The falls drop from a 66 metre or 216 feet cliff to the valley below.  Brandywine Falls Provincial Park is such a popular, accessible and beautiful sight that it has a large and elaborate viewing platform directly opposite the falls.  The park is just off the Sea to Sky Highway about 15 minutes before you reach Whistler. The snowplows intentionally clear a winter parking area for the park near the gate.  You just have to scramble over the mountain of snow, cross the parking lot and follow the signs.  The easy-to-follow trail begins just across the parking lot.  If you don't have snowshoes, take a look anyway on your drive by as it only takes a few people to hike/snowshoe to the falls before you to pack down the trail and make it easy to walk.  You will be able to tell as soon as you climb to the top of the mound of snow, plowed from the highway next to where you will park.  The trail to Brandywine Falls starts at a covered bridge over Brandywine Creek and then follows alongside the creek for less than a kilometre until you reach the impressive viewing platform across from this thundering waterfall.  Brandywine Falls is amazing to see in the summer, but in the winter it is even more extraordinary.  The sounds are echoed louder as they echo off the frozen chasm the water falls into, yet the area is magically serene with rarely anyone to break the peacefulness of the park.  The trail to Brandywine Falls is pretty short and if you are looking for another great place to snowshoe to in the area, the Whistler Bungee Bridge is a great option.  Just a few metres back from the Brandywine Falls viewpoint you would have passed the Sea to Sky Trail.  The Sea to Sky Trail runs almost entirely through the wilderness from here to Whistler Village.  It then continues through Lost Lake Park and up the back side of Green Lake before emerging from the forest at the north end of Whistler past the Wedgemount Lake trailhead.  From Brandywine Falls it is just two kilometres to the very impressive Whistler Bungee Bridge.  High above the Cheakamus River, this amazing bridge spans at a dizzying height.  From the Brandywine Falls trailhead/parking to the Whistler Bungee Bridge is a beautiful 6 kilometre, roundtrip snowshoeing adventure that takes you to both these amazing Whistler sights.  Brandywine Falls - Best Snowshoeing in Whistler

Brandywine Falls Map Winter

Blueberry Trail - Best Whistler Snowshoeing

Blueberry Park is Very NiceThe Blueberry Trail is a relatively unknown, though very scenic trail that ascends quickly up to a cliff viewpoint high above Alta Lake.  Geographically, the Blueberry Trail is directly across Alta Lake from Rainbow Park.  Rainbow Park can be accessed from either end via the neighbourhoods of Whistler Cay at the end of Crabapple Drive, or in Alta Vista at the end of St Anton Way.  Either trailhead is just a five minute drive from Whistler Village and both are conveniently close to Whistler's Valley Trail.  If it has not snowed heavily in the last couple days, you will likely not need snowshoes for the Blueberry Trail as the snow will have been packed down by others.  Blueberry Park gets its name from the hill that rises above it named Blueberry Hill.  So well hidden that you won't find either trailhead unless you search for them despite being on all the maps in Whistler.  The trailheads do have small trail signs and once you are on the trail it is easy to follow, even in deep snow.  Though at times steep, the trail is short.  The high point of the trail, about midway, is only 1.2k from either trailhead.  There is a small clearing at the edge of quite a high cliff that is a great vantage point to the lake.  People skating, cross country skiing or walking appear as little black dots scattered across the frozen lake.  As snowshoeing trails go, this one is a great, fun, short workout to a beautiful vantage point.  Dogs are allowed here as well.  Blueberry Park is a very scenic park on Alta Lake that most Whistler locals don't even know about.  If you have been to Rainbow Park you would have noticed four piers across Alta Lake surrounded by forest.  These public piers sit along the edge of Blueberry Park, with the Blueberry Trail running from one side of the forest to the other.  Blueberry Trail - Best Snowshoeing in Whistler

Blueberry Park Snowshoeing Map

Cheakamus River - Best Whistler Snowshoeing

Cheakamus River is a beautiful, crashing, turquoise coloured river that flows from Cheakamus Lake, through Whistler Interpretive Forest at Cheakamus Crossing, then down past Brandywine Falls to Daisy Lake.  Also a popular kayaking route, the main attraction to Cheakamus River is the wonderful and quite extensive network of hiking and biking trails that run along either side of it.  The Riverside trail and the Farside trail run on either side of Cheakamus River and connect at both ends by bridges.  Connecting to the Riverside trail is the short trail to Logger's Lake, which in turn is surrounded by more hiking and biking trails.  The Lake Loop trail, Crater Rim trail, the Ridge trail, Upper Ridge trail, and the Lower Ridge trail.  On the Farside trail along Cheakamus River you can connect to Cheakamus Road(gravel road) and hike 6 kilometres up to the Cheakamus Lake trailhead.  On the other side of the neighbourhood of Cheakamus Crossing, which Cheakamus River bends around keeping the Sea to Sky Highway and train tracks on its opposite side, you find still more hiking and biking trails.  Trash trail hugs the river all the way to the beautiful bridge to Whistler Train Wreck.  Or, continue past the bridge to connect with the Sea to Sky Trail.  For the most part, however, if you are talking about the Cheakamus River trails you are likely talking about the Farside and Riverside trails in Whistler's Interpretive Forest.  Eight kilometres south of Whistler Village and surrounding the recently constructed neighbourhood of Cheakamus Crossing is Whistler Interpretive Forest.  This beautiful forest surrounds the Cheakamus River and has been cut and replanted in several areas in the past decades. Hiking and biking trails have sprung up over the years making the area a wonderful place to explore. Unfortunately, the Interpretive Forest is day-use only, no camping is permitted.  The main highlights of the Interpretive Forest are the Cheakamus River trails, and the extraordinary Logger's LakeLogger's Lake, just a short hike from the Cheakamus River suspension bridge, sits within a 10000 year old, extinct volcano and is a hiking destination on its own.  Cheakamus River - Best Snowshoeing in Whistler

Cheakamus River Snowshoeing Map

Flank Trail - Best Whistler Snowshoeing

Flank Trail Rating is GoodHiking and biking trails are so abundant in Whistler that many go unnoticed, neglected or taken for granted.  The Flank Trail is one of these.  Most people in Whistler don't even know about it, but the ones that do, love it.  Officially known as the Rainbow-Sproatt Flank Trail, it runs the length of Whistler Valley, opposite Whistler Mountain and Blackcomb Mountain, and connects to dozens of hiking, snowshoeing and biking trails.  At roughly the mid point of the Flank Trail you will come to a small, overlapping section of the Rainbow Trail, near Rainbow Falls.  From Whistler Olympic Park to the Rainbow Trail, you will have hiked halfway around Mount Sproatt.  The Flank Trail seems to terminate at the Rainbow Trail, however a small sign directs you to turn right, follow the Rainbow Trail, for a couple hundred metres, then left after the water treatment building to the beautiful bridge over 21 Mile Creek.  A beautiful way to access the Flank Trail on snowshoes or on foot any time of the year is via the Rainbow Trail near Rainbow Park on the far side of Alta Lake.  From the road-side parking at the trailhead you are immediately plunged into deep forest, deep snow, and the sound of crashing water nearby.  The Rainbow Trail winds through the forest fairly steeply upward.  In less than a kilometre you come to Rainbow Falls crashing down through huge pillows of snow.  This little waterfall sits in a beautiful little snowy enclave that feels as though it belongs in some movie.  Deep snow, crystal clear green water cascading down from a frozen cliff.  A little, hidden paradise.  One of many in Whistler.  Further up the trail takes you to the first signs for the Flank Trail.  The Flank Trail overlaps and crosses the Rainbow Trail for half a kilometre.  The Flank Trail - Best Snowshoeing in Whistler

Flank Trail Snowshoe Map

Nairn Falls - Best Whistler Snowshoeing

Snowshoeing Nairn Falls is NiceNairn Falls Provincial Park is located just a twenty minute drive north of Whistler Village.  There is a nice, relaxing 1.2 kilometre hiking/snowshoeing trail that runs along Green River to a gorgeous viewing area in the midst of Nairn Falls.  The popular trail is actually hike-able year-round, so you most likely will not need your snowshoes unless there has been lots of new snow in the last couple days.  The trail is well marked and doesn't gain any significant elevation, making it a very easy, kid friendly trail.  The viewing area is located within a bend in the falls/river and the churning waters rushes around where you stand, far below.  The water crashes through deep cuts in the rock and rushes into deep, green pools.  There is a wonderful sign depicting how the area was formed over thousands of years.  A short side trail from the main viewing area takes you over to an abrupt edge, where you can look down on the Green River below.  Nairn Falls - Best Snowshoeing in Whistler

Nairn Falls Snowshoeing Trail Map

Taylor Meadow - Best Whistler Snowshoeing

Taylor Meadows, in Garibaldi Provincial Park is an amazing place to snowshoe in the winter near Whistler.  Beautiful snowy meadows surrounded by mountains everywhere you look.  Black Tusk towering in the distance so close and blanketed in wonderful, beautiful snow.  Garibaldi Lake is accessible as well on this snowshoeing hike.  The Taylor Meadows trail forks partway up, left goes to Taylor Meadows, right to Garibaldi Lake.  The trail joins again at the far side of both campsites.  Garibaldi Lake, so massive and dramatically beautiful in the winter, a huge frozen valley.  The downside to this hike is the length of hiking to get to the beautiful parts.  In the summer it's not so bad as the trailhead is a moderately difficult 9k from Garibaldi Lake.  In the winter however, the trailhead parking lot is unplowed almost down to the highway.  So just to get to the trailhead requires about a 2k uphill snowshoe slog.  If you snowshoe the beautiful route to Taylor Meadows and return via Garibaldi Lake the route is 25 kilometres long and very strenuous as a one day snowshoe trip.  Camping at either Taylor Meadows or Garibaldi Lake are great options if you can stand the cold and are well prepared.  If you plan to do this trip in one day be sure to leave very early and be well prepared for winter hiking.  In the winter the days are very short so always have lights with you.  Although the trail will likely be tracked out by previous hikers and skiers, having a gps is an excellent backup in case you lose the trail.  Taylor Meadows - Best Snowshoeing in Whistler

Taylor Meadows Snowshoeing Map

Rainbow Lake - Best Whistler Snowshoeing

The Rainbow Trail is a convenient and popular trail near Whistler Village that takes you to Rainbow Lake as well as the Rainbow Sproatt Flank Trail, Rainbow Falls, Hanging Lake, Madeley Lake, Beverley Lake, Rainbow Mountain... and even Whistler Olympic Park if you are determined.  It is a consistently uphill and very beautiful trail with several water (bridge) crossings and waterfalls on the way to the picture-perfect lake.  Rainbow Lake is a tough and beautiful 8 kilometre snowshoeing trail high up in the mountains across the valley from Whistler Mountain and Blackcomb Mountain.  The trail is generally well marked and easy to follow, however some sections are tricky to follow as the heavy snow bends the bushes down obscuring the trail.  The trail is a constant, fairly steep ascent and you may notice ski tracks along the route.  A somewhat popular skiing attraction in Whistler is to get heli-dropped on Rainbow Mountain and skiing back to Whistler.  Rainbow Falls is a nice detour near the beginning of the Rainbow Lake trail. When you come to the small water purification building you will see a distinct fork in the trail and a sign directing you to Rainbow Lake turn left.  If you go right however, in just a few hundred metres you will come to the beautiful Rainbow Falls as well as a nice picturesque bridge over the river.  You of course have to backtrack to get back to the Rainbow Lake trail.  Though Rainbow Lake is only 8k from the trailhead, on snowshoes it will likely take nearly four hours to get there.  You can snowshoe around up there for quite a while so you have to be careful with the time as in the winter months the sun goes down well before 5pm.  Rainbow Lake - Best Snowshoeing in Whistler

Rainbow Lake Snowshoe Map

Whistler Snowshoe Trails

Rainbow Falls is a fantastic way go get yourself into some deep snow quickly from Whistler Village.  The short, winding, and ever-changing hiking trail to Rainbow Falls is the same as the much more popular ...
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Wedgemount Lake is a steep and difficult hike in the summer when there is no snow.  It doesn't require technical skill, but it is just exhausting.  You gain 1220 metres of elevation in just 7 kilometres(+2 in ...
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The Rainbow Trail is a convenient and popular trail near Whistler Village that takes you to Rainbow Lake as well as the Rainbow-Sproatt Flank Trail, Rainbow Falls, Hanging Lake, Madeley Lake, Beverley ...
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Elfin Lakes in Garibaldi Provincial Park is an absolutely phenomenal, though long, hiking, biking, snowshoeing and skiing trail that begins at the Diamond Head area in Squamish.  From Whistler Village, the ...
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Vancouver Garibaldi Hiking Camping Rental

Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking

Easy Hiking Trail WhistlerAlexander Falls  Moderate Hiking Trail Whistler Dog FriendlyAncient Cedars  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerBlack Tusk  Pay Use Hiking Trail WhistlerBlackcomb Mountain  Easy Hiking Trail WhistlerBrandywine Falls  Moderate/Hard Hiking Trail Whistler Dog FriendlyBrandywine Meadows  Moderate/Hard Hiking Trail Whistler Dog FriendlyBrew Lake  Easy Hiking Trail WhistlerCallaghan Lake  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerCheakamus Lake  Whistler Hiking Trail EasyCheakamus River  Whistler Hiking Trail HardCirque Lake  Whistler Hiking Trail EasyFlank Trail  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerGaribaldi Lake  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerGaribaldi Park  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerHelm Creek  Joffre Lakes Hike in Whistler in SeptemberJoffre Lakes  Moderate Hiking Trail Whistler Dog FriendlyKeyhole Hot Springs  Hiking Trail Hard Dog FriendlyLogger’s Lake  Whistler Hiking Trail EasyMadeley Lake  Moderate/Hard Hiking Trail Whistler Dog FriendlyMeager Hot Springs Easy Hiking Trail WhistlerNairn Falls  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerPanorama Ridge  Easy Hiking Trail WhistlerParkhurst Ghost Town  Hiking Trail ModerateRainbow Falls  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerRainbow Lake  Moderate/Hard Hiking Trail Whistler Dog FriendlyRing Lake  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerRusset Lake  Whistler Hiking Trail EasySea to Sky Trail  Easy Hiking Trail WhistlerSkookumchuck Hot Springs  Easy Hiking Trail WhistlerSloquet Hot Springs  Moderate/Hard Hiking Trail Whistler Dog FriendlyMount Sproatt  Moderate Hiking Trail WhistlerTaylor Meadows  Whistler Hiking Trail EasyTrain Wreck  Hiking Trail Hard - Whistler TrailsWedgemount Lake  Pay Use Hiking Trail WhistlerWhistler Mountain

 Best Whistler AerialAlexander  Best Whistler AerialBrandywine  Best Whistler AerialBlackcomb  Best Whistler AerialCallaghan  Best Whistler AerialCirque  Best Whistler AerialJoffre  Best Whistler AerialKeyhole  Best Whistler AerialLogger's  Best Whistler AerialMadeley  Best Whistler AerialPanorama  Best Whistler AerialSproatt  Best Whistler AerialParkhurst  Best Whistler AerialRainbow  Best Whistler AerialRusset  Best Whistler AerialTrain Wreck  Best Whistler AerialWedge Glacier  Best Whistler AerialWedgemount  Best Whistler AerialWhistler

 Best Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking JanuaryJanuary  Best Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking FebruaryFebruary  Best Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking MarchMarch  Best Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking AprilApril  Best Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking MayMay  Best Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking JuneJune  Best Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking JulyJuly  Best Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking AugustAugust  Best Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking SeptemberSeptember  Best Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking OctoberOctober  Best Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking NovemberNovember  Best Whistler & Garibaldi Park Hiking DecemberDecember

Best Hiking by Month

There are plenty of beautiful and free snowshoe trails in Whistler and Garibaldi Provincial Park.  From the surreal paintings of Whistler Train Wreck to ...
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November in Whistler is when the temperatures plummet and the first heavy snow falls in the alpine and often in Whistler Village.  The hiking opportunities ...
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July is a wonderful time to hike in Whistler and Garibaldi Park.  The weather is beautiful and the snow on high elevation hiking trails is long gone.  The ...
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August hiking in Whistler definitely has the most consistently great, hot weather.  You can feel the rare pleasure of walking across a glacier shirtless ...
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Best Whistler Aerial Views

Alexander Falls is located far up in the Callaghan Valley just before the turnoff to Callaghan Lake Provincial Park.  The falls are very impressive with its ...
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Madeley Lake is a beautiful, remote mountain lake hidden high up in the Callaghan Valley.  From Whistler Village expect to take 40 minutes to drive there.  You ...
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Joffre Lakes Provincial Park is a gorgeous park with extraordinarily coloured lakes, waterfalls, stunning mountain peaks and ominous glaciers pouring into ...
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Whistler has an absurd number of wonderful and free hiking trails and Parkhurst Ghost Town certainly ranks as one of the most unusual, exotic and ...
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